Software development

Many of our clients create world-leading software, games, mobile apps and interactive e-learning, where an effective localisation process is essential for reaching their global audiences – whether consumers, gamers, enterprise customers or internal employees.

Unlike the translation of documents or websites, where the user experience is relatively linear, software requires a different approach, because the functionality of an application or game depends on user input and some level of interactivity.

This means that, as a developer or IT architect, you need to consider how to internationalise your product in a way which will lead to an efficient localisation workflow, especially when it comes to version-to-version updates and the all-important testing process.

If you already use a localisation tool such as Alchemy Catalyst, Passolo, QT Linguist or easyTRANSLATE/easyGUI, translate plus can support and improve your existing processes, handling packages from these applications (e.g. in .ttk, .lpu and .tbulic bundles) and, where appropriate, also combining these tools with the use of traditional translation memory to ensure full consistency with associated help content – which may be created in Flare, RoboHelp or other formats where you may not be using tools such as Catalyst or Passolo.

Alternatively, you may have designed your applications or games in a way in which all UI content is “externalised” into resource formats such as .resx, .rc, .properties, .strings or .po files, or perhaps your own custom XML structure.

(Visited 50 times, 1 visits today)

From the blog

How translate plus handles eLearning localization with all its complexities

The majority of our global clients have adopted eLearning practices to reach their multinational audiences, inside and outside their own teams. Localizing their eLearning content has proven to be key...

Read full article

Our clients say

"Thanks to you and your team for the excellent work and quick turnaround."

John Harrison, Road Marketing Manager

The Met Office