QA & regulatory affairs

Accuracy of information and attention to detail is never more important than if you work in Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs roles. Therefore, when you need something translated, it is essential that you can rely on your provider to always deliver perfectly accurate results. An inaccurate translation could affect your business’s legal standing as well as increase the health and safety risks for your customers.

We have experience working with the QA and Regulatory Affairs departments in a range of regulated industries such as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, energy, and banking. We understand the need to employ rigorous QA checks ourselves before delivery, starting with our selection of linguists through to our final proof reading.

To achieve such a high level of quality, we build and utilise glossaries for all of our clients. By doing this, you can be sure that the terminology used in your translations will be specific to your organisation’s products and services, in turn ensuring that any complex or brand-specific terminology is conveyed across all media and languages.

We are fully compliant with the translation quality standard EN15038, a prescriptive standard for the entire translation process, governing technology, processes, and the qualifications and expertise of linguistic and non-linguistic staff. We have also adopted methodology from the SAE J2450 quality matrix which is geared towards technical translations requiring a high level of accuracy, incorporating a quality metrics system which we offer our clients to measure our performance.

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